NATURE NEEDS YOUR HELP

Forest ecology depends on good fires, which are nature’s way of spring cleaning–clearing out brush, restoring natural habitats and preventing wildfires. Learn more about how carefully planned and professionally managed prescribed fires give nature some help at GoodFires.org.

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Help preserve the natural areas near you. Learn more about how prescribed fires help your forests stay healthy at GoodFires.org

There are 154 places within 200 miles of zip code 32310 (Tallahassee, FL) that match your search request.

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Displaying all parks, forests and wildlife areas.

SILVER RIVER STATE PARK Hiking Camping Boating

OCALA , FL 34470 (157.039 miles)

This park has more than 10 distinct natural communities, dozens of springs, and miles of beautiful trails. The park is home to a pioneer cracker village and the Silver River Museum and Environmental Education Center. The center is operated by the Marion County School District in cooperation with the park and is open to the public on weekends and holidays from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00. p.m. Admission to the Museum is $2.00 per person. Children under 6 are free. For more information please visit Silver River Museum.rn

Official Website: SILVER RIVER STATE PARK

Tuskegee National Forest Hiking Fishing Camping Biking Horseback Boating

Tuskegee, AL 36083 (161.869 miles)

Tuskegee National Forest lies in the east central part of the state west of Auburn, in Macon County.  Tuskegee National Forest topography is level to moderately sloping, broad ridges with stream terraces and broad floodplains.

Official Website: Tuskegee National Forest

Blackwater River State Forest Hiking Fishing Hunting Camping Biking Horseback Boating

Milton, FL 32570 (163.105 miles)

Blackwater River State Forest is one of the largest state forests in Florida, and is named for the Blackwater River, which begins to the north in Alabama and meanders approximately 30 miles southwestward through the forest into Blackwater Bay, near Milton, Florida. Blackwater River is one of the few shifting sand bottom streams which remains in its natural state for nearly its entire length. The topography of the forest is gently rolling and contains various natural communities.

Official Website: Blackwater River State Forest

Ocala National Forest Hiking Fishing Hunting Camping Biking Horseback Boating

silver springs, FL 34488 (163.607 miles)

The Ocala National Forest is located in central Florida between the Ocklawaha and St. Johns Rivers. The Forest is approximately 383,000 acres and is the southernmost forest in the continental United States. The Ocala National Forest is rich in water resources with more than 600 lakes, rivers, and springs.

Official Website: Ocala National Forest

FORT COOPER STATE PARK Hiking Fishing Boating

INVERNESS , FL 34450 (164.823 miles)

The sparkling waters of Lake Holathlikaha were a welcome sight to sick and wounded soldiers during the Second Seminole War. In 1836, the First Georgia Battalion of Volunteers built a stockade for the soldiers resting here, enabling the Volunteers to hold their own through several skirmishes with the Seminole Indians. The park´s diverse natural areas provide a refuge for many plants and animals, including threatened and endangered species.rn

Official Website: FORT COOPER STATE PARK

AMELIA ISLAND STATE PARK Fishing Horseback

JACKSONVILLE , FL 32226 (165.216 miles)

An easy drive from Jacksonville, the park protects over 200 acres of unspoiled wilderness along the southern tip of Amelia Island. Beautiful beaches, salt marshes, and coastal maritime forests provide visitors a glimpse of the original Florida.rn

Official Website: AMELIA ISLAND STATE PARK

BIG TALBOT ISLAND STATE PARK Hiking Fishing Camping Horseback Boating

JACKSONVILLE , FL 32226 (165.216 miles)

Located on one of Northeast Florida’s unique sea islands, Big Talbot Island State Park is primarily a natural preserve providing a premier location for nature study, bird-watching, and photography. Explore the diverse island habitats by hiking Blackrock Trail to the shoreline, Big Pine Trail to the marsh or Old Kings Highway and Jones Cut through the maritime forest.rn

Official Website: BIG TALBOT ISLAND STATE PARK

FORT GEORGE ISLAND CULTURAL STATE PARK Hiking Fishing Biking Boating

JACKSONVILLE , FL 32226 (165.216 miles)

Native Americans feasted here, colonists built a fort, and the Smart Set of the 1920s came for vacations. A site of human occupation for over 5,000 years, Fort George Island was named for a 1736 fort built to defend the southern flank of Georgia when it was a colony. Today´s visitors come for boating, fishing, off-road bicycling, and hiking. A key attraction is the recently restored Ribault Club. Once an exclusive resort, it is now a visitor center with meeting space available for special functions. Behind the club, small boats, canoes, and kayaks can be launched on the tidal waters.rn

Official Website: FORT GEORGE ISLAND CULTURAL STATE PARK

GEORGE CRADY BRIDGE FISHING PIER STATE PARK Fishing

JACKSONVILLE , FL 32226 (165.216 miles)

Located northeast of Jacksonville, this mile-long, pedestrian-only fishing bridge spans Nassau Sound providing access to one of the best fishing areas in Florida. Fishermen catch a variety of fish, including whiting, jacks, drum, and tarpon. The fishing bridge is open twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year. Primary access is on the north end through Amelia Island State Park. A small parking lot at the north end of Big Talbot Island State Park allows access to the southern end of the fishing bridge.rn

Official Website: GEORGE CRADY BRIDGE FISHING PIER STATE PARK

PUMPKIN HILL CREEK PRESERVE STATE PARK Hiking Fishing Biking Horseback Boating

JACKSONVILLE , FL 32226 (165.216 miles)

East of Jacksonville's skyscrapers and west of the beaches, this state park protects one of the largest contiguous areas of coastal uplands remaining in Duval County. The uplands protect the water quality of the Nassau and St. Johns rivers, ensuring the survival of aquatic plants and animals, and providing an important refuge for birds. Wildlife is abundant and ranges from the threatened American alligator to the endangered wood stork. Equestrians, hikers, and off-road bicyclists can explore five miles of multi-use trails that wind through the park's many different natural communities.rn

Official Website: PUMPKIN HILL CREEK PRESERVE STATE PARK